Resources

Ecopoetics: Projects, Statements, Manifestos

James Engelhardt. “The Language Habitat: an Ecopoetry Manifesto

Permapoesis Permapoesis is the portmanteau for permanent making, a term I’ve developed, incorporating permaculture principles and indigenous thinking, to define a practice of art that participates in what it represents; that is of its environment; that generates no waste.

Journals

Ecopoetics (Ed. Jonathan Skinner) ecopoetics is a (more or less) annual journal dedicated to exploring creative-critical edges between making (with an emphasis on writing) and ecology (the theory and praxis of deliberate earthlings).  ecopoetics operates in print time, or even slower.  The “blog” is mostly for information, the occasional announcement, and to facilitate free access to back issues of the magazine (via pdf).

How2 Feature on Ecopoetics

Courses

Jonathan Skinner EN355 Ecopoetics course at Warwick University 

Conferences

Ecopoetics February 22-24 2013 The term ecopoetics has become increasingly important to scholars and poets alike. It is certainly a critical moment for the field and practice. Please join us in February for a three-day conference that will focus specifically on exploring ecopoetics, taking up such questions as: What is ecopoetics? What representational strategies and sociopolitical commitments might characterize this practice? How might we periodize ecopoetics and situate its modes of cultural production? It is our hope that the conference will bring scholars, poets, and creative artists into sustained dialogue on the historical and contemporary practices of ecopoetics.

International Conference on Ecopoetics:“Dwellings of Enchantment: Writing and Reenchanting the Earth” Under the aegis of the research center (CRESEM) and the University of Perpignan Via Domitia, this ecopoetics conference (France June 22nd-25th 2016) aims to cast light on the rhizomatic convergences between literatures that tend to be bunched into the separate categories of ecofeminist, postcolonial or environmental studies. The purpose is to show how the fiction and non-fiction of these writers with a specific interest in place as well as in the non-human realm overlap, intersect, and engage in a fruitful, multicultural dialogue, opening imaginative and insightful perspectives onto the world. For, does not much nature writing present us with an ecological picture of organic interrelatedness similar to the motif of the sacred hoop expressing the interconnected web of all life forms in Native American tradition (Paula Gunn Allen)? And does not most nature writing consist in a movement to reenchant the world, or in other words/worlds, to re-sing the world?

Papers will be welcome that will address some of the following issues:

▪   Are certain genres–the lyric essay, the short story, the novel, drama, film or poetry–better suited to the writing of nature?

▪   What place might dystopic fiction occupy in ecocritical studies?

▪   Can these writers be said to contribute to a literature of hope?

▪   Might the reenchantment of the quotidian and the natural be particularly inclined toward magical realism as a liminal mode dealing with, in Wendy Faris’s terms, “ordinary enchantments?”

▪   What are the roles of myth and/or science when fiction and non-fiction draw from these other forms of discourse about the world?

▪   What is the contribution of phenomenology and ecopsychology to the field of ecopoetics?

▪   What impact has ecopoetics had on politics?

▪   Do ecopoetic texts reveal, as Linda Hogan claims, something which “dwells beneath the surface of things”?

▪   Can it be said that all nature writers are mystics? What kind of “mystical experiences,” “numinous encounters,” “inexplicable revelations” do nature writers tell about (Mark Tredinnick)?

▪   What is the place of oneirism in the writing of nature?

▪   What is the importance of liminal experiences of nature? What can we learn from moments in literature when human apprehension suddenly opens to forms of “terrestrial intelligence” (Linda Hogan), or sentience, pertaining to animal, mineral, vegetal, or elemental realms?

▪   What are the different ways in which one’s sensitivity to the other-than-human world shapes one’s writing, and eventually articulates with nature?

▪   Is there such a thing as “the land’s wild music” (Mark Tredinnick)? How may we learn to listen for it? What kind of musicality arises then, within the very writing of/with nature?

▪   How might “thinking like a mountain” (Aldo Leopold) or hearing like a bat (Linda Hogan) ripple into and through the writing of nature?

Events during this ecopoetics conference will be held in English and French. Abstracts (300-400 words) with a brief biographical note should be sent by September 1st, 2015 to benemeillon@gmail.com. Acceptance will be notified by October 15th.

Reference Sources on Ecology and Poetry

Dictionary of Literary Biography: Twentieth-Century Nature Writers: Poetry. Vol. 342. New York: Gale, 2003, (KSC Reference)

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (Mason library PN1021 .N39 1993).

Dictionary of Literary Biography The multi-volume reference source is available in the Reference section of the Mason Library. I include below the relevant volumes in the series. The call number is REF PN451.D5.

American Poets Since World War II, A–K. Vol. 5.1. Ed. Donald Greiner. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1980.

American Poets Since World War II, L–Z. Vol. 5.2. Ed. Donald Greiner. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1980.

The Beats: Literary Bohemianism in Postwar America, A–L. Vol. 16.1. Ed. Ann Charters. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1983.

The Beats: Literary Bohemianism in Postwar America, M–Z. Vol. 16.2. Ed. Ann Charters. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1983.

Afro-American Poets Since 1955. Vol. 41. Eds. Trudier Harris and Thadious M. Davis. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1985.

American Poets, 1800–1945. First Series. Vol. 45. Ed. Peter Quartermain. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1985.

American Poets, 1800–1945. Second Series. Vol. 48. Ed. Peter Quartermain. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1985.

American Poets, 1800–1945. Third Series. Vol. 54.1 Ed. Peter Quartermain. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1986.

American Poets, 1800–1945. Third Series. Vol. 54.2 Ed. Peter Quartermain. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1986.

American Poets Since World War II. Second Series. Vol. 105. Ed. R.S. Gwynn. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1991.

American Poets Since World War II. Third Series. Vol. 120. Ed. R.S. Gwynn. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1992.

American Poets Since World War II. Fourth Series. Vol. 165. Ed. Joseph Conte. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1996.

American Poets Since World War II. Fifth Series. Vol. 169. Ed. R.S. Gwynn. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1996.

American Poets Since World War II. Sixth Series. Vol. 193. Ed. R.S. Gwynn. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 1996.

Walt Whitman: A Documentary Volume. Vol. 224. Ed. Joel Myerson. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 2000.

The Beats: A Documentary Volume. Vol. 237. Ed. Matt Theado. Detroit: Bruccoli Clark, 2001.

 

General Writing Sources
Joseph Gibaldi, ed., MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (sixth ed.)

The twenty-volume Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is available in the Reference section of the Mason Library. The call number is PE1625 .O87 1989. You may access the OED online (on campus users only) by going to the Mason Library Home Page and clicking on Resources or by opening up Oxford English Dictionary on any campus computer.

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